All posts by Emily Binder

Emily Binder is a marketer who likes good copy, technology, and progress. Hobbies include chess, cooking, and rollerblading. University of Michigan alumna.

How to Choose Where You Live

The city where you live can hugely impact your happiness. Some people say it doesn’t matter where you live, that you make your own happiness wherever you go. I beg to differ. The energy of a city is so important to your ability to thrive there. The weather is important too, more for some people than others. I really dislike being cold. I grew up in Chicago, went to college in New York and Michigan, and moved to the south primarily because I knew warmer weather would make me happier. It really did. So did other things about Atlanta.

Why I Moved from Atlanta to Austin

After eight years in ATL, I got the itch to try out another place. I wanted to get rid of my stuff and get rid of my 9-5 and make Beetle Moment Marketing my main job. I wanted to move somewhere with a greater focus on outdoor activities and a stronger sense of community, a place with less tension — without giving up my fantastic network and clients in Atlanta. So I’m splitting time between Austin and Atlanta. Semi-dual residency is my experiment for the next year or so. Airfare can be cheaper than bus fare if you know a few travel hacks.
people kayaking on Ladybird Lake
Ladybird Lake in Austin

My research

Who’s Your City,  though getting older and not the absolute answer to the question, is still a solid skim on the topic of choosing a place to live. Richard Florida has devoted his research to cities and what makes them and their residents prosper. Penelope Trunk did the same thing and after a year of thorough city happiness research moved from NYC to Madison, Wisconsin.  I examined the attributes of several U.S. cities and picked the one with the most pros for me: Austin, Texas.
page from Who's Your City
How do you like the place you’re living now?
It’s easier to move when you don’t have a mortgage or a job that requires you to be in one place. But if these apply to you, it’s still possible to rearrange your life to make a change or even become nomadic. Sell it, rent it, request remote work, quit, freelance…

And remember: jobs come and go.

We place too much emphasis on work in this country. No one on their death bed wishes they’d worked more. That said, I like working — more accurately, I love working for myself.
Emily at FBO looking at jets
Wheels up

What to do with all your stuff

Own a home? Rent it out. Have too much stuff? Sell it ALL. Inherit an old boat recently? Hire Captain Ron to help you sail it from the Caribbean to Miami, then decide to just keep sailing. The internet has made all of this easier than ever.

Downsize to joy items

Start to downsize early, then moving becomes much easier mentally. I sold or donated all my furniture and came to Austin with only boxes containing things like my InstantPot and Himalayan salt lamps and Casper pillow and rollerblades. Stuff that brings me joy: ditch the rest. Buy newer models of what you sold.

A chance to upgrade

When I move again I will pare it down even further. I’m excited to be lighter than ever. All those blazers and Brooks Brothers shirts and high heels from my corporate days are just taking up room in my closet. I’ve been thinking more about this since seeing the YouTube trend of young people living in their cars. Eileah Ohning from Columbus lived in her car for several months, motivated in part by wanting to save money to pay off student loans. That is a travesty, but student loan debt is a separate topic. The point is that it’s possible to be happy living really lean. Here are more moneysaving tips for your twenties.
I couldn’t downsize into a sedan like Eileah did (impressive) but I did embrace the discomfort of starting over from scratch. It’s a chance to upgrade… everything.

BeanCast 465: Sulking and Condescension

Listen here

PANEL

Emily Binder, Principal, Beetle Moment Marketing

Saul Colt, Principal, The Idea Integration Co.

Jonathan Sackett, President, Mashburn Enterprises

David Spark, CEO, Spark Media Solutions

Bob Knorpp, Host, The BeanCast

 

TOPICS

Choosing a Marketing Cloud

Sources: MediaPostAdexchanger

Problems with Going to Video

Sources: Digiday

Agency Models

Sources: Digiday

Evolving the TV Spot

Sources: Recode

 

Aired September 25, 2017

Adapted from original post by Bob Knorpp on thebeancast.com

How to Download Instagram Pictures

You can’t directly download Instagram pictures to your phone or computer from the app or from the photo’s URL. This is supposedly to protect copyright on photos. However, preventing you from downloading your own photos is ridiculous: they are yours! And given that there are workarounds to download any photo on IG, disabling this inside the app just makes more work for users. But that’s the case for now.

Two ways to download Instagram photos:

1) Google Chrome Developer Tools (best way to download to your computer):

  1. Open the Instagram image in Google Chrome and click to pop it out (full view).
  2. Right click (on Mac: CTRL+click) the image and select “Inspect.”
  3. You’ll see the Elements view. Hit CTRL+F then enter “jpg” so you can find the jpg URLs in the code.
  4. Click the down arrow to the right of the finder bar to see the next instance of “jpg” until your photo is highlighted (blue tinted/selected like below). It will probably be the second jpg instance (the first is your avatar).

    Chrome Developer Tools highlighting Instagram photo URL
    Find the jpg URL that is your photo
  5. Highlight the jpg URL and copy it. It’s fine if you highlight the whole paragraph which is more than just the image URL, for example:
    <img class=”_2di5p” src=”https://instagram.fmkc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/t51.2885-15/e35/21827421_172300296664014_7469834922526507008_n.jpg” style=””>
  6. Just paste the whole thing into a new browser window and delete the extra characters. So you’ll have just the URL (beginning with https and ending in .jpg), for example:
    https://instagram.fmkc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/t51.2885-15/e35/21827421_172300296664014_7469834922526507008_n.jpg
  7. Right click (or on Mac CTRL+click) and hit Save Image As.

2) DownloadGram.com (alright way to download to computer or phone)

This website worked on one photo for me, but on the second I got an error. Give it a whirl if you don’t like dealing with code in method #1.
Note: Alternatives InstaSave and Dinsta are garbage. You can hardly tell which parts of the site are CTAs vs. ads. They look like virus farms. Avoid.
Oh and don’t forget this fun stipulation which you’ve agreed to in Instagram’s Terms and Conditions:
Instagram (owned by Facebook) can legally save and sell your photos to an advertising agency.
How to download Instagram photos using DownloadGram:
  1. Go to https://www.instagram.com/
  2. Find the Instagram picture you want to save and click on it.
  3. Copy the photo’s URL from the web address bar in your browser.
  4. Go to https://downloadgram.com/ 
  5. Paste the photo’s URL into the box with the auto-generated Instagram link, above the Download button.

    Downloadgram homepage
    Paste the Instagram photo URL here.
  6. Click Download. Then, click the resulting Download Picture button to save your image.

Looking for help keeping your profile private, knowing if someone saw that you liked a photo, or understanding how blocking works? Check out my top Instagram help posts:

Instagram Privacy Tips and FAQ

Instagram Tips: Liking and Unliking

Six Years of Answering Instagram User Questions

I provided the original Instagram FAQ. Information in demand was missing from the internet and I enjoy researching technology and helping people. I wrote two posts in 2011 and 2012 about Instagram privacy which still rank in Google’s top 10 search results for related terms.

Six years and 700+ comments later, here’s what I’ve learned about human frailty, desire, shame, and searching.

woman looking at the water holding her phoneIn 2011, Instagram was growing in popularity but lacked a formal FAQ. Users desperately sought information about whether their accidental photo likes would be visible to their exes and frenemies.

Instagram FAQ comment
One of the top 3 Instagram questions I receive.
Instagram FAQ question
Will they know I liked the photo if I do everything possible to prevent it?

I’ve answered hundreds of questions in the comments and continue to receive more each week. After six years of fielding queries about Instagram profile privacy, blocking, hiding likes, push notifications, and whether video views are public, I have concluded that we waste far too much time worrying about the visibility of our activity. We feel unnecessary shame. We want to hide what we consider shameful: voyeurism, the masochism of cyber stalking an ex, or simply our fascination with others’ lives. These are timeless human behaviors that have adapted to the available means. Look at songs like Don’t Come Around Here No More and On Every Street. Everyone can relate to these lyrics. Songs like these play in my head as I read through the comments on my Instagram posts. We’re nostalgic, we’re sentimental, we seek information and updates on lost loves, lost friends, lost places.

It’s clear that we use social media for many reasons. One is to satisfy our hunger for connection and validation. We do this less and less in person and increasingly online. So much is lost in this digital version of interacting.

Instagram privacy question
How do I get my new ex to stop copying me online?

I’ve seen the fear of being found out for behaviors that are common and understandable. We have been given tools to passively, secretly watch the highlight reels of each others’ lives. So naturally we watch. And we slip and click and immediately feel ashamed and self-conscious, exposed for engaging in the very behaviors that the creators of these apps and our fellow users expect and encourage.

Chicago rowhouse neighborhood

Tom Petty asked his ex to “stop walking down my street”. She probably wouldn’t want to be seen but couldn’t help herself. Now she’d be embarrassed to be caught accidentally liking his two-year old photo. Mark Knopfler uses the metaphor of a detective looking for a missing person when writing about an ex he just can’t forget. Ani DiFranco captures the same sentiment in Gravel, still under her ex’s spell. We keep holding on to each other, to memories, to old flames, to friendships that dried up, and to places we’ve left behind. We seek connection and belonging, and we cling to the moments when we felt it. But we’re looking somewhere that can never meet our needs.

How a WTF Moment Became the New Normal – StandFor Interview

This Fourth of July, I had a memorable WTF moment with one of the rudest people I’ve ever met. What makes it noteworthy is that many consider his behavior normal. I tell the story in this interview with StandFor: Technology as an Escape Mechanism

Excerpt:

…To put it in context with technology: the Like button came out in 2009, then Facebook’s first mobile app was released in 2010, but it was pretty awful. Smartphones outsold PCs for the first time in the last quarter of 2011. Facebook improved its app, and with every iteration, it became smoother and more addictive, fueling phubbing.

In the U.S., having and responding to work email on your phone at all hours became expected as smartphone use increased, encouraging the unhealthy always-on worker mentality. The pendulum swung further when Instagram hit a penetrative point, having 150 million MAUs by late 2013, three years after launch.

I’d say 2012-2013 is when phubbing became really noticeable.

These social apps are engineered to be highly addictive. It’s a business that profits off usage. I noticed people checking their phones not just for text messages (actual communication) but being addicted to refreshing their social feeds like slot machines (passive, receptive entertainment) because the apps for Facebook and Instagram became so addictive. Facebook became the internet for many people. These apps are designed to encourage addictive checking just like cigarettes and McDonald’s fries cause cravings. Smartphones with apps, messaging, and email provide what became a socially acceptable escape mechanism for the boring or awkward moments of daily life

Read more at The Talk: Technology as an Escape Mechanism.

#talkyourwalk

Emily sitting near grass
Me at the StandFor photo shoot – wearing Quit Phubbing shoes

Photo credit: Heather Haberkern (Heather is a talented stylist, interior designer, and photographer who led the StandFor photo shoot)