BeanCast 469: Meditation for All

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This was the most serious BeanCast I’ve been on, understandably so in the wake of Weinstein / the #MeToo movement and news confirming Russia’s interference in our presidential election. Our brand loyalty chat was really interesting too, especially with Farrah’s insights from market research suggesting that there really is no loyalty. The discussion was so intense that we ran about 15 minutes over the hour mark. P.S. I second Rachel’s recommendation for the 10% Happier App – meditation for fidgety skeptics. It’s great.


TOPICS

Is Efficiency Killing Brands

Sources: Ad Age opinion

Getting Loyalty Wrong

Sources: Mediapost opinionAd Age reports

Regulating Online Political Ads

Sources: NYT reportsVerge reportsRecode reports

Calling Out Sexual Harassment

Sources: Ad Age reportsAdweek on WPP’s moves


BeanCast 465: Sulking and Condescension

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PANEL

Emily Binder, Principal, Beetle Moment Marketing

Saul Colt, Principal, The Idea Integration Co.

Jonathan Sackett, President, Mashburn Enterprises

David Spark, CEO, Spark Media Solutions

Bob Knorpp, Host, The BeanCast

 

TOPICS

Choosing a Marketing Cloud

Sources: MediaPostAdexchanger

Problems with Going to Video

Sources: Digiday

Agency Models

Sources: Digiday

Evolving the TV Spot

Sources: Recode

 

Aired September 25, 2017

Adapted from original post by Bob Knorpp on thebeancast.com

How to Download Instagram Pictures

You can’t directly download Instagram pictures to your phone or computer from the app or from the photo’s URL. This is supposedly to protect copyright on photos. However, preventing you from downloading your own photos is ridiculous: they are yours! And given that there are workarounds to download any photo on IG, disabling this inside the app just makes more work for users. But that’s the case for now.

Two ways to download Instagram photos:

1) Google Chrome Developer Tools (best way to download to your computer):

  1. Open the Instagram image in Google Chrome and click to pop it out (full view).
  2. Right click (on Mac: CTRL+click) the image and select “Inspect.”
  3. You’ll see the Elements view. Hit CTRL+F then enter “jpg” so you can find the jpg URLs in the code.
  4. Click the down arrow to the right of the finder bar to see the next instance of “jpg” until your photo is highlighted (blue tinted/selected like below). It will probably be the second jpg instance (the first is your avatar).

    Chrome Developer Tools highlighting Instagram photo URL
    Find the jpg URL that is your photo
  5. Highlight the jpg URL and copy it. It’s fine if you highlight the whole paragraph which is more than just the image URL, for example:
    <img class=”_2di5p” src=”https://instagram.fmkc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/t51.2885-15/e35/21827421_172300296664014_7469834922526507008_n.jpg” style=””>
  6. Just paste the whole thing into a new browser window and delete the extra characters. So you’ll have just the URL (beginning with https and ending in .jpg), for example:
    https://instagram.fmkc1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/t51.2885-15/e35/21827421_172300296664014_7469834922526507008_n.jpg
  7. Right click (or on Mac CTRL+click) and hit Save Image As.

2) DownloadGram.com (alright way to download to computer or phone)

This website worked on one photo for me, but on the second I got an error. Give it a whirl if you don’t like dealing with code in method #1.
Note: Alternatives InstaSave and Dinsta are garbage. You can hardly tell which parts of the site are CTAs vs. ads. They look like virus farms. Avoid.
Oh and don’t forget this fun stipulation which you’ve agreed to in Instagram’s Terms and Conditions:
Instagram (owned by Facebook) can legally save and sell your photos to an advertising agency.
How to download Instagram photos using DownloadGram:
  1. Go to https://www.instagram.com/
  2. Find the Instagram picture you want to save and click on it.
  3. Copy the photo’s URL from the web address bar in your browser.
  4. Go to https://downloadgram.com/ 
  5. Paste the photo’s URL into the box with the auto-generated Instagram link, above the Download button.

    Downloadgram homepage
    Paste the Instagram photo URL here.
  6. Click Download. Then, click the resulting Download Picture button to save your image.

Looking for help keeping your profile private, knowing if someone saw that you liked a photo, or understanding how blocking works? Check out my top Instagram help posts:

Instagram Privacy Tips and FAQ

Instagram Tips: Liking and Unliking

How a WTF Moment Became the New Normal – StandFor Interview

This Fourth of July, I had a memorable WTF moment with one of the rudest people I’ve ever met. What makes it noteworthy is that many consider his behavior normal. I tell the story in this interview with StandFor: Technology as an Escape Mechanism

Excerpt:

…To put it in context with technology: the Like button came out in 2009, then Facebook’s first mobile app was released in 2010, but it was pretty awful. Smartphones outsold PCs for the first time in the last quarter of 2011. Facebook improved its app, and with every iteration, it became smoother and more addictive, fueling phubbing.

In the U.S., having and responding to work email on your phone at all hours became expected as smartphone use increased, encouraging the unhealthy always-on worker mentality. The pendulum swung further when Instagram hit a penetrative point, having 150 million MAUs by late 2013, three years after launch.

I’d say 2012-2013 is when phubbing became really noticeable.

These social apps are engineered to be highly addictive. It’s a business that profits off usage. I noticed people checking their phones not just for text messages (actual communication) but being addicted to refreshing their social feeds like slot machines (passive, receptive entertainment) because the apps for Facebook and Instagram became so addictive. Facebook became the internet for many people. These apps are designed to encourage addictive checking just like cigarettes and McDonald’s fries cause cravings. Smartphones with apps, messaging, and email provide what became a socially acceptable escape mechanism for the boring or awkward moments of daily life

Read more at The Talk: Technology as an Escape Mechanism.

#talkyourwalk

Emily sitting near grass
Me at the StandFor photo shoot – wearing Quit Phubbing shoes

Photo credit: Heather Haberkern (Heather is a talented stylist, interior designer, and photographer who led the StandFor photo shoot)

BeanCast 458: The Least Amount of Work Possible

I hopped on The BeanCast to discuss the fickleness of influencer programs and whether content marketing offers up truly better results. Facebook will offer mid-roll video ads– ugh. This seems like a cash grab to me, and is at the very least cart before the horse considering their tracking failures with existing pre-roll. Of course Facebook has ambitions to advertise on connected TV apps and mid-roll on the site/app may just be research, but I’m not a fan. That said, audiences will probably deal with it, as Zuck has a great batting average at predicting what users will tolerate.

A sloth is the featured image because Twitter’s $99/month premium subscription plan (in private beta now) seems like way for non-marketers and small businesses to check a box that won’t really do much for them. Tamsen zeroes in on the appeal of this budgetable expense. Then we talk about GIFs – how marketers should use them, and the fact that we’re probably devoting too much time to discussing GIFs.

Listen to The BeanCast on Apple Podcasts

July 31, 2017

PANEL

Emily Binder, Consultant, Beetle Moment Marketing

Saul Colt, Founder, The Idea Integration Company

Bill Green, Consultant/Blogger/Author, Adverve

Tamsen Webster, Consultant, TamsenWebster.com

Bob Knorpp, Host, The BeanCast


TOPICS

Content vs Influence

Sources: MediaPost thoughts

Facebook’s Midroll Ad

Sources: blog analysis

Twitter’s Subscription Service

Sources: Business Insider

GIF Marketing Now

Sources: MediaPost analysis


Adapted from original post by Bob Knorpp on thebeancast.com

Marketing, Technology, Life